September 23

  1. September 22

  2. September 21

  3. (Source: liukin, via usagym)

  4. Today, ten years ago, Svetlana Khorkina retired from gymnastics after a decade of success, tears, gold medals, and disappointments. Since her childhood, Khorkina fought against a sport that was not made for girls like her. During her journey, she knew the glory, and also the nightmare, but every time she fell, she came back stronger.

    You may love her, or you may hate her. You may detest her for her temperamental attitude, or you might adore her just for that. But truly there’s something you can not feel about Sveta: indifference. And, at the end, that’s what makes a performer, that, no matter what, all the eyes will be on you. Because, when the day is over, the people probably may not remember if you won or if you lost, or the medal you got, but you can rest assured that they will remember what you made them feel. And that’s what counts.

    Today, ten years ago, the career of Svetlana Khorkina finished, but the myth started.

    (Source: like-dudnik-in-1989, via bars-beam-floor-vault)

  5. September 20

  6. Gymnastics Conditioning

    Thanks to Sheelah Bearfoot and Julie Rolla for preparing these conditioning tips for our members. Thanks to Vinh Nguyen, Matej Jan, Sean Chilelli and Give it 100 for the visuals. :)

    The Four Main Body Parts:

    1. Arms
      1. Triceps
      2. Shoulders
      3. Biceps
    2. Abs
      1. Obliques
      2. Lower Abs
      3. Upper Abs
    3. Legs
      1. Calves
      2. Hamstrings
      3. Quadriceps
    4. Core

      Core and abs are related, but distinct. Core consists of your glutes, quads, abs, and back. The key difference between working core and working the other body parts is that working core strength requires engaging all these areas at once as a simultaneous unit. Core conditioning can be roughly split into two groups:

      1. Abs engaged (front core)
      2. Back engaged (back core)

    Why do we care about conditioning?

    1. Common Injury Prevention

      1. Arms: Arm conditioning provides support for elbows and shoulders, commonly injured areas in gymnastics. Being stronger helps you do skills safely by having more control


      2. Abs: Ab conditioning is very important for having control and “staying tight” while performing virtually any skill in gymnastics, from handstands to front fulls. Keeping the proper body position is key to landing safely and preventing injuries to other body parts, something that is nearly impossible without some abdominal strength.


      3. Legs: Strengthening leg muscles creates support for ankle and knee joints and helps you safely absorb the impact incurred from punching off and landing.
      4. Core: A strong core has similar benefits to strong abs and legs; it helps you minimize the impact from skills and keep the proper body position. This is VITAL to preserving the most commonly (and most gravely) injured body parts in gymnastics: shins, fibula, ACL, anywhere in your lower back, and your meniscus.



      IMPORTANT NOTE: Conditioning is NOT meant to be therapy or repair for an injury. It is a preventative measure. You need to do specific physical therapy exercises if you become injured.

    2. Ease in Skill Progression

      
This is pretty intuitive. Being stronger and more controlled allows you to get skills faster and more cleanly. Proper form and body position is everything in gymnastics, and conditioning is what allows you to have it.

    Read More

  7. September 18

  8. usagym:

    American Gymnasts: 20/

    » Kennedy Baker

    (via bars-beam-floor-vault)

  9. September 17

  10. mustafinesse:

Still The Best Vault Ever

    mustafinesse:

    Still The Best Vault Ever

  11. September 14

  12. mustafinesse:

    How crazy is it that Kyla, Charlotte, and McKayla could all potentially go to the olympics (maybe at the same time).  Like what are the chances of 3 girls that grew up together and trained at the same gym, out of hundreds of little girls, make an olympic team!!!! its cray!

  13. September 12

  14. gymanddaisies:

    Kui Yuanyuan (CHN) competes balance beam in the 1996 Olympics Team Final (x)

    She scored a 9.875, the highest result on beam of the competition

    (via thegymnasticsnerd)

  15. mustafinesse:

aint no layout like a chinese layout!

    mustafinesse:

    aint no layout like a chinese layout!

  16. k-ohashi:

    2004 Athens: Event Champions

    (via asacsdoublearabian)

Practice

  1. Gymnastics Conditioning

    Thanks to Sheelah Bearfoot and Julie Rolla for preparing these conditioning tips for our members. Thanks to Vinh Nguyen, Matej Jan, Sean Chilelli and Give it 100 for the visuals. :)

    The Four Main Body Parts:

    1. Arms
      1. Triceps
      2. Shoulders
      3. Biceps
    2. Abs
      1. Obliques
      2. Lower Abs
      3. Upper Abs
    3. Legs
      1. Calves
      2. Hamstrings
      3. Quadriceps
    4. Core

      Core and abs are related, but distinct. Core consists of your glutes, quads, abs, and back. The key difference between working core and working the other body parts is that working core strength requires engaging all these areas at once as a simultaneous unit. Core conditioning can be roughly split into two groups:

      1. Abs engaged (front core)
      2. Back engaged (back core)

    Why do we care about conditioning?

    1. Common Injury Prevention

      1. Arms: Arm conditioning provides support for elbows and shoulders, commonly injured areas in gymnastics. Being stronger helps you do skills safely by having more control


      2. Abs: Ab conditioning is very important for having control and “staying tight” while performing virtually any skill in gymnastics, from handstands to front fulls. Keeping the proper body position is key to landing safely and preventing injuries to other body parts, something that is nearly impossible without some abdominal strength.


      3. Legs: Strengthening leg muscles creates support for ankle and knee joints and helps you safely absorb the impact incurred from punching off and landing.
      4. Core: A strong core has similar benefits to strong abs and legs; it helps you minimize the impact from skills and keep the proper body position. This is VITAL to preserving the most commonly (and most gravely) injured body parts in gymnastics: shins, fibula, ACL, anywhere in your lower back, and your meniscus.



      IMPORTANT NOTE: Conditioning is NOT meant to be therapy or repair for an injury. It is a preventative measure. You need to do specific physical therapy exercises if you become injured.

    2. Ease in Skill Progression

      
This is pretty intuitive. Being stronger and more controlled allows you to get skills faster and more cleanly. Proper form and body position is everything in gymnastics, and conditioning is what allows you to have it.

    Read More

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